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Jeju foreigner market embraces natural food and craftsThe importance of food and community highlighted at monthly Heirloom5 Harvest Farmers' Market
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승인 2011.10.05  14:41:24
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▲ Stephanie McLean sold her sketches and paintings at this month's foreigner farmers' market. Photo by Sarah Warren

When we imagine a community, we envision people gathered together, sharing, talking and relating in some or many ways. This month’s Heirloom5 Harvest Farmers’ Market accomplished this and more.

“Food and community is the most important thing in life,” says Shay Pacetti, the creator of Heirloom5 Foreigner Farmers’ Market. Pacetti wanted something to do other than sitting at a bar, “I wanted to do something resourceful, and encourage people to try as well.”

Soon after arriving in Jeju to teach English, and after many homemade meals shared with both old and new friends, she quickly noticed the talent foreigners were sharing on this little island. “I realized that so many foreigners were making so much good food and crafts, that we should come together and share it […] I wanted to make a community around our talent of making things.”

The best thing about the market, says Pacetti, “is that you can bring something as long as it’s homemade. So, people who can’t cook can bring a craft.”

▲ Pillows, scarves, knitted animals and figures were sold at a few booths this month. Photo by Sarah Warren
▲ CheSoon sold "Peace Herbs," which are actually rose herbs, but these particular herbs have no roots. "I don't have roots yet but with your loving care, my roots will grow strong in about two weeks." She said they symbolize the hope that peace will root down in Gangjeong, the construction site for a naval base in Jeju. Photo by Sarah Warren

Heirloom5 embodies the idea of something not being mass-produced, says Pacetti. “It stands for a small batch of something.” The definition of heirloom can be “something of special value, handed on from one generation to another.” It can’t be mass produced, and it’s one-of-a-kind, just like something that is homemade: it’s different every time.

“The 5 [represents that] someday I want to own a company doing food tours, and there are five continents I want to visit before I do this,” says Pacetti. “The trips will be based around learning about different cultures and foods.” The continents include: Europe, Asia, South America, Africa and North America, says Pacetti.

The freedom implied in making something homemade is also a huge part of building this community. “I love that I just have to put out this space for people, the intention and the idea, and people just come and do what they want,” says Pacetti.

The market kicked off on Oct. 2 at 11 a.m. Tables were quickly set up, and the food and crafts were sold almost as swiftly. The last foreigner’s market was in May, and it was half the size of this month’s, says Pacetti. “There [were] more artists this time, and quite a few more Korean friends showed up. There [was] also more food made to be eaten [right away],” as opposed to food meant to be taken home.

People were selling vegetarian wraps, raw coconut balls, all kinds of unique bread, pie and cake, veggie curry, barbeque-pulled pork sandwiches, sausage, pickled veggies, ravioli and peanut brittle to name a few. At the last market, people were even selling home-brewed beer and cheese. Pillows, buttons, magnets, knitted garments, T-shirts, paintings, sketches, poetry, pottery and wine racks made from driftwood and stones found on Jeju’s beaches were some of the many handcrafted goods sold at the market.

“[This is a] market for food [and arts and crafts] made from the heart,” said Britt Neufer, who was selling prints and paintings.

This month marked the second foreigner farmers’ market. The next market will be held in November. Check out the Web site for updates.

▲ Britt Neufer sold spray painted prints, Heirloom5 posters, and stone paintings at this month's foreigner farmer's market. Photo by Sarah Warren
▲ Jessie Dishaw sold buttons, magnets, clips, scarves ad pillows at this month's foreigner farmers' market. Photo by Sarah Warren
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All materials on this site are protected under the Korean Copyright Law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published without the prior consent of Jeju Weekly.
폰트키우기 폰트줄이기 프린트하기 메일보내기 신고하기
페이스북 트위터

CheSoon sold "Peace Herbs," which are actually rose herbs, but these particular herbs have no roots. "I don't have roots yet but with your loving care, my roots will grow strong in about two weeks." She said they symbolize the hope that peace will root down in Gangjeong, the construction site for a naval base in Jeju. Photo by Sarah Warren

Jessie Dishaw sold buttons, magnets, clips, scarves ad pillows at this month's foreigner farmers' market. Photo by Sarah Warren
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