JEJU WEEKLY

  • Updated 2018.11.15 19:00
  • All Articles
  • member icon
  • facebook cursor
  • twitter cursor
LifestyleFood and Drink
Necessity + innovation + fermentation = a healthy Jeju drinkContributor Kim Jung Lim walks us through the making of shindari
폰트키우기 폰트줄이기 프린트하기 메일보내기 신고하기
승인 2012.06.15  13:36:17
페이스북 트위터
▲ Shindari ingredients. Photo by Kim Jung Lim

Readers, please note that with any recipe involving fermentation, there is a danger of food poisoning. Please exercise caution if you decide to try this recipe. — Ed.

Caution. The summer season is eyeing the food on your table. In the old days when there was no easy way to keep food refrigerated and safely stored, summer was synonymous with food poisoning.

In particular, the islanders’ staple of boiled barley, a substitute for rice which didn’t grow well here, was a perishable food item. But since people were so poor, they couldn’t afford to throw out rotten barley.

So they came up with a method to transform rotten barley into a healthy drink.

Shindari is a Jeju traditional fermented drink using barley or rice. It is made by putting nuruk, the round-shaped wheat malt fermentation starter, into a mix of boiled grain and water. After fermentation, the grain and water become a sweet and sour alcoholic drink, mild enough for people of all ages to enjoy.

Since shindari is made with traditional ingredients and methods, it has recently attracted attention as a well-being food. It is rich in lactobacillus and promotes digestion. If the alcoholic liquid is not boiled, it becomes a natural, healthy vinegar(*), which for centuries has been used in the preparation of Jeju food.

Ingredients
200g boiled rice or barley
40g nuruk
400ml water
40g sugar
(*) Note that the amounts above are only guidelines. You can modify them to taste.

Serves one to two people.

1. Keep the boiled rice or barley at room temperature for one to two days until it becomes very soft.

▲ Nuruk. Photo by Kim Jung Lim

2. Break the nuruk into small pieces by hand.

▲ Nuruk in rice water. Photo by Kim Jung Lim

3. Add the nuruk and water to the rice and store it in a clean, well-sealed container for one to two days in the summer, or five to six days in winter.

▲ Covered and fermenting mixture. Photo by Kim Jung Lim

4. When bubbles appear on the surface of the rice water and the shape of individual grains of rice disappear, strain the contents using a sieve.

5. Add sugar to taste. The sweeter, the less sour.

6. Boil, then let cool and serve.

(*) When it is boiled, the fermentation process stops. If you don't boil it, the mixture increases in alcohol content until eventually it becomes a vinegar.

▲ The finished product. Photo by Kim Jung Lim


References
“Jejudo Food” written by Jeju food expert Kim Ji Soon
“Jeju Traditional Food” published by Jeju Special Self-Governing Province Agricultural Research And Extension Services
ⓒ Jeju Weekly 2009 (http://www.jejuweekly.com)
All materials on this site are protected under the Korean Copyright Law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published without the prior consent of Jeju Weekly.
폰트키우기 폰트줄이기 프린트하기 메일보내기 신고하기
페이스북 트위터
60 Second Travel
Jeju-Asia's No.1 for Cruise

Jeju Weekly

Mail to editor@jejuweekly.com  |  Phone: +82-64-724-7776 Fax: +82-64-724-7796
#505 jeju Venture Maru Bldg,217 Jungangro(Ido-2 dong), Jeju-si, Korea, 690-827
Registration Number: Jeju Da 01093  |  Date of Registration: November 20, 2008  |  Publisher: Hee Tak Ko  | Youth policy: Hee Tak Ko
Copyright 2009 All materials on this site are protected under the Korean Copyright Law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published
without the prior consent of jeju weekly.com.

ND소프트